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than gaddafi. host: we will he coverage of the president's speech to the nation of the u.s. involvement in libya coming from the national defense university. live cerage at 7:30 p.m. eastern time, 4:30 p.m. on the west coast. for more details, go to our web span.org.uesc- next caller. caller: mike x brother in law as a retired navy cmdr. winners in this latest war is a military industrial complex. mike, you are a good spokesperson for t work complex. is there ever a program of conflict resolution? what if all of the people working for him on conflict resolution -- we have all of these people and putting troop on the ground. where is conflict resolution in this scenario? guest: i would argue that there has been a concerted effort to avoid escalating this problem in libya. we saw that early on when there was a great deal of complaining about the fact that we were not getting involved sooner. during the course of that, there was this conflict resolution effort. the problem is there was a drum beatrom both extremes sides. there was a call for a no-fly zone. some wanted to go out there immed
-jazeera english. were you born in the u.s.? did you go to college here in washington? are you six-foot eight? [laughter] >> all of the above. i was born in egypt. my parents immigrated to the u.s. when i was 5 years old. went to school right down the street at american university. i started working for nbc news right across the street from american university. i started off as a desk assistant. i was handed out newspapers in the morning and answering phone calls. most of the time i was justin all of the correspondence, but it was a great environment to see how people operate in the high-pressure environment. the summer that i started i was actually going to leave journalism. my parents were like you have a master's degree, this is not what you're born to be working on. i actually stayed through by chance until 9/11 happened and the rules of the game completely changed. there was all this talk about the war in iraq following year. this is what led me to cnn and ultimately to iraq. >> you skipped one of the questions. >> 6 bef foot four. >> you have not mentioned saudi arabia in terms of unres
administration and the u.s. said the arab countries are dominoes don't, domino pieces and they will fall one after the other. what happens is these projects fell like domino effect. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: and because some have very short memories on satellite channels, let me remind them. not everything that happens our conspiracy. because now they are ready to commence on the speech. but you, sons and daughters of this nation, your dedication to your country that you expressed day after day, and more clearly in times of crisis that you expressed it yesterday with those mass rallies in all parts of the country give me more confidence and make me steadfast, and that you work in face of the division give me hope for the future. and if you said with our soul and with our blood, sacrifice for you, the right thing to say is bashar assad sacrifices for his country. [chanting] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: and i answer you, god, syria, the people. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i will always remain the son of this nation, will keep
's at the greatest risk. it's their immigration problem rather more than the uk. maybe the u.s. and uk would play a part. i think people who advocate armed humanitarian intervention need to think quite widely about the kind of coalition that would be put together. >> yes, you had a question in the back. >> i'm maria, i'm a postgraduate student at the african studies. i've been very much following what's been happening in the past month, being from the middle east myself as well, and of course, it's very interesting. and my question is on something that i've been thinking about is the definition of how al-jazeera is defining the professionalism, so to say. the western ethics of journalism, and i put western between two quotations. i wanted to know your upon about how al-jazeera is kind of playing with the idea of distance, the emotional distance. it's not like any other channel. when you watch specific, you can use egypt and libya and tunisia, and i you feel like you are part of the news. al-jazeera has redefined the concept of coverage in the last events. and the other question is what do you thi
for investment from u.s.. i think finally you will get a kick out of the one mccain and i were on. we met with a crew of the leaders of the uprising and one of them said to us, senators, we want to ask if you can help us to get one american who we would most like to come and speak to us here and i thought to myself who is this going to be. and the answer, mark zuckerburg. [laughter] welcome because -- because they felt in some sense, first he represented the new world of telecommunications but that in some sense he had provided or facebook provided them with what we might call the weapons in their peaceful revolution. >> very remarkable. i'm very hopeful. >> i can't think the two of you enough for what you've done in my testimony. it's very helpful, very specifically helpful to focus our review that will go on for the rest of this year. we are going to keep the record of and for 15 days for additional questions and statements. thank you again very much. the hearing is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]รท?oy,
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5